5 Ways To Beat Pregnancy Indigestion

Many of the tips for fighting heartburn can also help with your reflux. Avoid digestive overload. Skip the three big squares. Six small meals are the solution to many pregnancy symptoms, from heartburn to bloating to lagging energy.

Some also contain aluminum, which is not considered safe for pregnancy. Heartburn occurs when the valve between the stomach and the esophagus are unable to prevent stomach acid from passing back into the esophagus. During pregnancy, the hormone progesterone causes the valve to relax, which can increase the frequency of heartburn. This allows stomach acid to pass into the esophagus and irritate the lining.

When can I expect the heartburn to end during pregnancy?

Sleeping propped up by two or three pillows may also help in the later stages of pregnancy. Always talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking any medicine during pregnancy.

Headache and migraine remedies that are safe during pregnancy

better to be safe, and we’re here to help your pregnancy – and GI tract – flow smoothly. Lifestyle modifications are the first line of management in pregnant women with GERD. To reduce symptoms and increase comfort related to GERD, advise pregnant patients to elevate the head of their bed; avoid bending or stooping positions; eat small, frequent meals; and refrain from ingesting food (except liquids) within 3 hours of bedtime. The pigmentation of your skin is usually effected by pregnancy hormones, with pigmented areas such as moles, freckles and nipples the most obviously effected.

What makes pregnancy different is the distortion of the organs in the abdomen and the increased abdominal pressure caused by the growing fetus. These changes clearly promote the reflux of acid. The cause of heartburn (also called gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD) during pregnancy is more complicated than in the non-pregnant state.

  • Heartburn affects 22% of women in the first trimester, 39% in the second and 72% in the last.
  • The State of Victoria and the Department of Health & Human Services shall not bear any liability for reliance by any user on the materials contained on this website.
  • Do not use antacids that have magnesium trisilicate, because they may not be safe for your baby.

Yep, it can be, according to Nordahl. That might seem counterintuitive, as cramps are super-typical symptoms of Aunt Flow. You were probably hoping that being pregnant meant you could kiss cramps goodbye, but sadly that’s not the case. Light cramps can be caused by early pregnancy hormonal shifts and implantation of the fertilized egg on your uterine lining.

And they often get worse throughout the pregnancy. Heartburn is common when you are pregnant. That’s because hormones cause the digestive system to slow down. The muscles that push food down the esophagus also move more slowly when you are pregnant.

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Once you’ve determined you’re pregnant, make an appointment with your doctor. If your test is negative and you’re still experiencing pregnancy symptoms, you should check with your doctor.

Health information on this site is based on peer-reviewed medical journals and highly respected health organizations and institutions including ACOG (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists), CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics), as well as the What to Expect books by Heidi Murkoff. Feeling the burn badly? You may want to stock up on baby shampoo. Research has backed up the superstition that, on average, the more heartburn you have during pregnancy, the more likely your baby will be born with a full head of hair. Implausible as it sounds, it seems that the hormones responsible for heartburn are the same ones that cause fetal hair to sprout.

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