Laryngopharyngeal Reflux

Heartburn is the most common symptom of acid reflux or GERD but a chronic cough is also a symptom. Nasal congestion that comes and goes may be one of the acid reflux symptoms you’re ignoring. “If you’ve tried cutting down on reflux-producing foods or eating late at night and the symptom doesn’t go away, it’s probably just congestion,” says Dr. Sam. “But if it goes away and comes back, and then goes away again, it’s probably acid reflux.” If this or other symptoms continue to bother you, check in with your doctor.

Being overweight also contributes to acid reflux; if you are overweight, it would help to lose weight. Large meals at one time are troublesome, and so three or four equal, small feedings are preferable to one or two large meals. One should not eat for 2 or 3 hours before bedtime; it is advisable not to lie down right after eating. So, to simply round everything up – can acid reflux cause sinus congestion?

Therefore, some patients with GERD will have normal amounts of acid reflux and some patients without GERD will have abnormal amounts of acid reflux. It requires something other than the pH test to confirm the presence of GERD, for example, typical symptoms, response to treatment, or the presence of complications of GERD. GERD also may be confidently diagnosed when episodes of heartburn correlate with acid reflux as shown by acid testing. When GERD affects the throat or larynx and causes symptoms of cough, hoarseness, or sore throat, patients often visit an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist.

That is to say, the acid can travel all the way up to your nose and sinuses (for instance, while you are lying down asleep), and this acid can inflame the nose and sinus linings. This problem is more common in children – but it may also be seen in adults. Sometimes, the symptoms of GERD can mimic some of the symptoms of sinusitis. The sensation of post nasal draining and the need to clear your throat constantly may be due to post nasal drip – but may also be due to GERD.

In some cases regurgitated material can even be seen passing out through the nose, but this is not common. Common symptoms are nighttime snoring and coughing. Acid reflux can strike at any age, and that includes infancy. Although usually associated with digestive symptoms such as a burning sensation in the chest, acid reflux can also cause respiratory problems, including nasal congestion, asthma and tightening of the airways. Congestion can refer to either an unwanted accumulation of fluids such as mucus in respiratory pathways or swelling of membranes that blocks the passage of air.

Rather, they are added to other drugs for GERD when the other drugs are not adequately effective in relieving symptoms. There is only one foam barrier, which is a combination of aluminum hydroxide gel, magnesium trisilicate, and alginate (Gaviscon). PPIs are used when H2 antagonists do not relieve symptoms adequately or when complications of GERD such as erosions or ulcers, strictures, or Barrett’s esophagus exist. Five different PPIs are approved for the treatment of GERD, including omeprazole (Prilosec, Dexilant), lansoprazole (Prevacid), rabeprazole (Aciphex), pantoprazole (Protonix), and esomeprazole (Nexium), and dexlansoprazole (Dexilant). A sixth PPI product consists of a combination of omeprazole and sodium bicarbonate (Zegerid).

Pro-motility drugs increase the pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter and strengthen the contractions (peristalsis) of the esophagus. Both effects would be expected to reduce reflux of acid.

Treating Post-Nasal Drip Caused by Infections

For tips on identifying and treating sinusitis, head to the American Academy of Asthma Allergy and Immunology. For information on acid reflux disease, visit the American College of Gastroenterology. For his part, Smith believes acid may not have to reach the sinuses or even the throat to exacerbate sinus woes. Instead, GERD or LPR could trigger neurological changes linked to sinusitis. That theory could explain the results of a small study conducted in 2002 by researchers at the University of Nebraska.

pH testing has uses in the management of GERD other than just diagnosing GERD. For example, the test can help determine why GERD symptoms do not respond to treatment. Perhaps 10 to 20 percent of patients will not have their symptoms substantially improved by treatment for GERD.

The sinus specialist may therefore examine you in the office to see if there is physical evidence of GERD.

However, even in children with reflux, you should always put your baby to bed on their back – not their stomach – to reduce risk for suffocation. Babies are prone to reflux – be it GERD or LPR – because of a number of factors. Dr. Brian L. Matthews, a professor of otolaryngology at Wake Forest University, describes this type of reflux as a less common, distinct condition called laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). It is the sensation of having a “drip” in the back of the throat, which can also be accompanied by feeling the need to clear your throat.

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